The Rundown- August ’16

Another reason I love my new job: I was able to read three books this month, even with school starting!

16616258._SY540_Everyday by David Levithan (new read)

The blurb I read about this story is what made me want to pick it next. “A” is a genderless, soulless being that inhabits a different body each day. A is aware of what happens to it, and has its own feelings and opinions, but no body to call its own.

Each day A wakes up in a new body. They are all about the same age and live within a few hours of each other. Because of this, sometimes A is able to see people from multiple perspectives. A traditionally tries not to become very involved in the life of the person it inhabits, until he falls in love with a girl named Rihannon. Then all bets are off!

This was a really interesting book, and definitely a new take on the “freaky friday” syndrome. I couldn’t wait to find out what would happen after A broke its own rules and became attached to someone it met for a day.

VERDICT: I think this book has a wide appeal and is unlike any other story I can think of. It was also really easy to read and full of suspense, which I adore. I’m going to agree with its inclusion on the list!

 

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson (reread) BridgeTerabithia6

I know I read this book in fifth grade for class. I have no memories of whether or not I liked this book, only the tragedy of the book. Something that did surprise me is that there was a good bit of swearing, which makes me wonder if this book was read aloud and the teacher skipped over those words 🙂

Jesse doesn’t have many friends until Leslie moves to town. They bond over their outsider status and create their own magical world called “Terabithia.” At times, their conversations seem much more mature than their ten years, but then you think of all the things they’ve been through in that amount of time.

I don’t want to completely spoil it for those that haven’t read it, but I think most of the reason it is so widely praised is because of its not-so-happy ending. Kids are able to go through it without having it happen to them in real life.

VERDICT: This Newbery Medal winner earns its place for helping children deal with their first dose of tragedy.

*Check out Ashley’s review HERE*

231804The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton (reread)

I went from one tragic read to another. However, this one skews to the older crowd. It’s very raw and realistic. I found out after reading that the author wrote it in high school! That makes it all the more impressive.

It has remnants of West Side Story, in that there are rival gangs in a big city around the same time frame. The Socs and the Greasers are divided by their socioeconomic status. The “outsiders” are the Greasers, and that’s the group whose lives we get an indepth look at, thanks to Ponyboy Curtis, our narrator.

It is amazing the relevance that this book still has today. Some of the details could easily be changed and you would swear it was written about life as it is now. It has such a timeless quality.

The importance of this book and the insight it gives cannot be overstated. It peels back the layers of both groups of teenagers and examines their motivations for the things they do, as well as the circumstances surrounding them.

VERDICT: As heartbreaking as this book is, the importance of understanding where others come from is a universal truth that all young adults need to be aware of. Definitely should be included!

 

Advertisements

February ’15 Update – Ashley

Nothing like the last day of the month to do my monthly update, right?  February was a very hectic month, so unfortunately most of my reading was postponed until the end of the month.

Here’s what I read:

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson (reread) – This was my second reading of this particular book.  The first time I read it was actually in college for a Children’s Lit class.  I remember loving it the first time and the second time was no different.

BridgeTerabithia6

Bridge to Terabithia centers around the friendship between its two main characters – Jess Aarons and Leslie Burke.  The two are unlikely friends, but their mutual awkwardness and shared tendency to behave “differently” from the status quo is enough to create a lasting bond.   Together, they create their own magical land, the namesake Terabithia, where they go to escape their ordinary, if not depressing, lives.  The story takes a turn when tragedy strikes Terabithia and Jess is forced to deal with things far beyond his ten or eleven years.  At that point, it’s probably best to just go ahead and grab your tissues.

My Take:  Finding Bridge to Terabithia on “the list” was no surprise.  This is one of those books that makes you reevaluate life and love.   I appreciate that this book, written for very young adults (preteens even), touches on some very heavy topics in a way that is super-relatable.  Being a teacher of young children allows me to read these kinds of books through a completely different lens.  I see the Jesses and Leslies of the world every day in my own classroom – the kids that don’t quite “fit in” because maybe their family is a little bit different or they interested in something considered unusual for their age, gender, whatever.  I’ve seen the way their lives change when they find that one friend with a common soul who understands and accepts them as they are.  I want that for every child.  It also makes me sad to think about how many kids out there are like this, but never find that one friend who will change their life…  Overall, this book is an easy read with a big message and definitely worth the minimal time it takes to read.  I dare anyone to try to get through the whole thing with dry eyes!

* Frindle by Andrew Clements (new read) – I have to be honest about my deciding factors for reading this book first off of my (lengthy) new read list.  #1) I totally judged the book by its cover.  Those kids holding that pen… so cute!  Plus, the cover also included a review hailing it as a “hilarious” read, which I was ready for after sobbing my way through Terabithia.  #2) It was the shortest of all the new reads I just ordered and I was running short on time for my first monthly challenge (aka I started reading it this morning).  Just felt like I needed a disclaimer about my true motivations…  <insert sheepish look here>

frindle

Frindle is story about young Nick Allen who has a knack for causing minor “disturbances” at his elementary school – things like transforming his third grade classroom into a tropical paradise… and getting his first-year teacher to buy into it!  However, after meeting his all-business fifth grade teacher (Mrs. Granger), Nick’s escapades seem to be in jeopardy.  That is, until he spontaneously decides to create a brand-new word: frindle (to name the object formerly known as a pen).  His seemingly harmless prank catches some steam and soon the word has grown beyond Nick’s control.  Meanwhile, Mrs. Granger is doing everything in her power to thwart frindle-users everywhere.

My Take: First of all, I love lovelove the character of Nick!  I love the way his mind works and that his portrayal does not stay true to any one stereotype.  He’s smart, but not nerdy.  He’s unusual, but not a “weirdo.”  He’s a bit mischievous, but not mean-spirited.  Secondly, I love that this book, written for elementary- and middle-schoolers, isn’t focused on the social issues they may face at school, but rather on a child’s growing curiosity and innovation.  So many books directed at this audience tend to deal with those social issues (admittedly important in more than one way), but I feel like we have a generation of children who need to know that creativity is important too.  I feel like they need permission to take risks and to think outside the box, and more importantly, to want to have an impact beyond their immediate scope.  Frindle at first glance is a funny story about a silly, made-up word, but the implications of what Nick created reach towards a greater purpose and hint at what can happen when kids make up their mind to change even one small part of their world!  This book left me smiling and inspired to think big…  Another easy, but worthwhile, read!

So… what do you think?  Has anyone else read Terabithia or Frindle?  Do you agree with my reviews?  I’m excited to hear everyone’s thoughts!

Now, I’m off to decide on what to read in March…

Happy Reading!  🙂