The Rundown- August ’16

Another reason I love my new job: I was able to read three books this month, even with school starting!

16616258._SY540_Everyday by David Levithan (new read)

The blurb I read about this story is what made me want to pick it next. “A” is a genderless, soulless being that inhabits a different body each day. A is aware of what happens to it, and has its own feelings and opinions, but no body to call its own.

Each day A wakes up in a new body. They are all about the same age and live within a few hours of each other. Because of this, sometimes A is able to see people from multiple perspectives. A traditionally tries not to become very involved in the life of the person it inhabits, until he falls in love with a girl named Rihannon. Then all bets are off!

This was a really interesting book, and definitely a new take on the “freaky friday” syndrome. I couldn’t wait to find out what would happen after A broke its own rules and became attached to someone it met for a day.

VERDICT: I think this book has a wide appeal and is unlike any other story I can think of. It was also really easy to read and full of suspense, which I adore. I’m going to agree with its inclusion on the list!

 

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson (reread) BridgeTerabithia6

I know I read this book in fifth grade for class. I have no memories of whether or not I liked this book, only the tragedy of the book. Something that did surprise me is that there was a good bit of swearing, which makes me wonder if this book was read aloud and the teacher skipped over those words 🙂

Jesse doesn’t have many friends until Leslie moves to town. They bond over their outsider status and create their own magical world called “Terabithia.” At times, their conversations seem much more mature than their ten years, but then you think of all the things they’ve been through in that amount of time.

I don’t want to completely spoil it for those that haven’t read it, but I think most of the reason it is so widely praised is because of its not-so-happy ending. Kids are able to go through it without having it happen to them in real life.

VERDICT: This Newbery Medal winner earns its place for helping children deal with their first dose of tragedy.

*Check out Ashley’s review HERE*

231804The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton (reread)

I went from one tragic read to another. However, this one skews to the older crowd. It’s very raw and realistic. I found out after reading that the author wrote it in high school! That makes it all the more impressive.

It has remnants of West Side Story, in that there are rival gangs in a big city around the same time frame. The Socs and the Greasers are divided by their socioeconomic status. The “outsiders” are the Greasers, and that’s the group whose lives we get an indepth look at, thanks to Ponyboy Curtis, our narrator.

It is amazing the relevance that this book still has today. Some of the details could easily be changed and you would swear it was written about life as it is now. It has such a timeless quality.

The importance of this book and the insight it gives cannot be overstated. It peels back the layers of both groups of teenagers and examines their motivations for the things they do, as well as the circumstances surrounding them.

VERDICT: As heartbreaking as this book is, the importance of understanding where others come from is a universal truth that all young adults need to be aware of. Definitely should be included!

 

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